Ford Tracking Police Cruisers to Catch Speeding Cops

The Los Angeles Police Department has added 50 transmitters to police cruisers to monitor the driving behavior of their force while out in the field. We’ve all seen the high speed police chases out there on the internet, some viral in nature, chases where innocent drivers may be endangered by the speed of the police in pursuit, but this is not the only time the speed of an officer’s vehicle is in question.

The system, called “Ford Telematics for Law Enforcement” is the beta test for this new technology and if it goes well for Los Angeles, other law enforcement agencies in other cities and states may choose to have the driving system installed in their vehicles as a safety measure.

It will be interesting to gauge the officers response to having their driving monitored overall. It could potentially increase greater awareness of how they handle their vehicles while on duty and just by its very presence, improve safety.

Read more.

http://www.theverge.com/2014/11/6/7166899/ford-tracking-police-lapd

A Single Speeding Ticket Can Impact Your Insurance Rates

You probably know how expensive it is should you end up with a speeding ticket with high fines and or fees and have to pay it. Though each state has different traffic laws for speeders, what many drivers don’t understand  is the serious implications a ticket can carry when it comes to your insurance rates.  These increased insurance rates can impact what you end up paying for car insurnace for around 3 years on average.

The article from InsuranceQuotes.com provides a list of traffic ticket violations and what percentage rate increase you could expect for each of these.

READ THE ARTICLE NOW.

Ohio House Bill 69 Would BanTraffic Cameras in Ohio

After a Hamilton County Common Please Court judge ruled in March that speed enforcement cameras in one municipality in that county were a violation of citizens due process rights, a bill was introduced in the Ohio House that would remove the cameras that catch red light runners and speeders alike. According  to the senators that backed the bill and a study from North Carolina, the cameras reportedly did not decrease accidents or save lives at intersections where they were installed.

One supporter of the bill, Senator Hood of Ashville Ohio states that though the cameras are supposed to be used to catch those who violate the law, they apparently are generating large amounts of revenue or are a  “money grab for local governments.”  The North Carolina study cited earlier notes that in some instances traffic accidents actually increased at the intersections with cameras in place.

Other legislators oppose the bill, pointing to statistics from Toledo Ohio where there was a 39% reduction in crashes due to red light cameras. Read the story

Post your comments and thoughts about red light cameras in your state below.

 

Washington DC Red Light Camera Ticket Revenue

One traffic camera location in Washington DC accounts for 28% of the speeding ticket revenue in the District.  DC-295 according to a recent press release from AAA Mid-Atlantic, brings in 28% of the total drivers paid $23,792,905 in fines from the districts speed and red-light cameras during 2012.

To read the remainder of the article visit the link below.

Washington DC Speeding Ticket revenue

Speeding Ticket in Washington DC? Visit Traffic ticket USA to read about your rights under Washington DC Traffic Laws.

Traffic Ticket Costs – Statistics

LawGuru Answers

According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, the majority of Americans out on the road are not aware of just how much it can cost them when they are pulled over for a speeding ticket or traffic ticket violation. And based on the type of infraction, not only can insurance premiums rise but they can rise  a significant amount for a serious offense such as a reckless driving charge, as much as 22%, while driving without a license could raise your rates as much as 18%. Factors including the state where you receive your ticket, your age and location will impact your insurance premiums and this doesn’t even address the cost of the fine or penalty itself when you receive a ticket.

There are some options that exist if you want to avoid the insurance premium increases and potentially decrease the fines:

1. Fight the ticket

2. Weight alternate pleas

3. Look into another insurance plan/provider

4. Stay focused, don’t get another ticket

5. Invest in a driving course

It might be advantageous and worth the investment to hire a traffic ticket lawyer that has familiarity with the traffic laws and experienced in traffic courts in the state or county where you received your ticket to assist in handling your speeding ticket.

Read the article

Cities & States That Give Out the Most Speeding Tickets

 

According to a recent article in the Chicago Tribune, the National Motorists Organization and Google Insights for Search data, Chicago ranks 6th among cities in the U.S. where you are most likely to receive a speeding ticket from a uniformed office if you are caught going over the speed limit. Other cities in US that rank in the top 10 include Atlanta, Los Angeles, Dallas-Fort Worth, New York City and Miami.

To find out which states rank highest overall for most speeding tickets given, visit the link below.

Read the article – Worst states and cities for speeding tickets.

Cleveland Browns Football Player Caught Speeding

Josh Cribbs, Cleveland Browns football player and the NFL’s all time kickoff return touchdown leader, twice selected to play in the pro bowl, was caught in his 2010 Bentley on I-71, going 102 in a 60 mph zone According to the Cleveland Plain Dealer Cribbs tweeted about the incident twice and commended the officer who pulled him over for doing his job. Also reportedly, Cribbs treated the officer with respect and was remorseful of his offense.

To read the story visit the link below.

Josh Cribbs Speeding Ticket Story (Cleveland Plain Dealer 3/9/12)

North Carolina Judge Suspended for Fixing Friend’s Traffic Tickets

According to a recent news article, the North Carolina Supreme Court suspended Forsyth District Judge Hartsfield for 2 1/2 months for fixing traffic tickets for friends, including members of her church congregation and her law school students.

The investigation of misconduct on the part of Judge Hartsfield began in 2008 after a large amount of citations were found in a briefcase that belonged to a former clerk. According to court records, Judge Hartsfield and the clerk, Jason Pollard worked together in handling the ticket fixing for friends and family.

In September 2011, the judicial standards commission made the recommendation for suspension of Judge Hartsfield after discovering she improperly entered judgments in at least 82 cases.

The suspension of Judge Hartsfield by the NC Supreme Court was only the second since 2007 when the punishment was first allowed.

North Carolina Traffic Laws

 

Dallas’ Red Light Cameras may Face Changes as Revenue Estimate Drops

Initial gross revenue estimates for the red light camera system during Dallas’ 2007-08 fiscal year were $14.8 million, according to city records. The latest estimate? About $6.2 million. City Manager Mary Suhm on Friday estimated net revenue will fall $4.1 million under initial estimates.

That leaves Dallas government with a conundrum. Its red-light camera system has been an effective deterrent to motorists running red lights – some monitored intersections have experienced a more than 50 percent reduction. But decreased revenue from red light-running violations means significantly less revenue to maintain the camera program and otherwise fuel the city’s general fund.

Exacerbating the drain is a new state law requiring that municipalities send half of their net red-light-running camera revenue to Austin and post signs alerting drivers of upcoming camera installations. Also, city records indicate Dallas has lengthened yellow-light intervals on 12 of its 62 monitored traffic signals, giving motorists more time to beat a red light.

City transportation officials say they’re brainstorming potential changes to the red-light camera program, which is financed by the general fund, before a planned update to the City Council next month on the program’s status.

“We did not anticipate having such success so early with the number of people not running red lights,” said Zaida Basora, Dallas’ assistant director of public works and transportation. “If you have success in safety, you don’t have a lot of success in revenue. The other side is the people will go back to what they were doing before without the cameras.”

source

Driver Sues Over Radar Van Tickets in California

New Hampshire motorists who use drive time to chat on the phone, read the paper or apply makeup may want to San Jose, California – A driver nailed by a roving radar truck in San Jose is taking his case to court in hopes of getting back the money he spent on speeding tickets and increases in insurance costs for himself and others mailed fines by the city.

The city killed the program that put white radar photo vans on the streets to cut down on speeding after questions were raised in 2006 about the legality of having city engineers – not cops – write citations.

But that was after officials had issued about $5 million worth of tickets through the decade-old program. In 2006 alone, San Jose issued 7,000 tickets using the radar vans that took photos of a speeding car’s license plate and driver. Notices of the violations were then sent to the vehicle’s registered owner.

Jorge Luis Ramirez’s attorney contends that since the tickets were illegal, the city should pay back what it got from the program. Attorney James McManis filed the lawsuit in Santa Clara County Superior Court on Monday.

“They have this illegal program,” he said. “They should do the right thing” and pay back those who were charged under the program.

City Attorney Richard Doyle had not seen the lawsuit as of Monday afternoon, but he said the city didn’t know the program was illegal when it ran it. As soon as officials learned that the state Legislature was questioning such programs, he said, the city stopped using the radar vans.

“It was a program that everyone had operated in good faith,” he said.

Doyle said the courts sanctioned the program because judges and commissioners signed off on the tickets when they were brought to court. People who questioned the legality of the program, he said, could have appealed.

Ramirez was twice ticketed by the radar vans – both times for going less than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. He paid the tickets but later decided to bring the suit after friends told him it was unusual to be cited for such a small infraction

Leslie Griffy, MercuryNews.com